Accessibility Tools
  • Hip Anatomy

    The hip joint is the largest weight-bearing joint in the human body. It is also referred to as a ball and socket joint and is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The thigh bone or femur and the pelvis join to form the hip joint. Any injury or disease of the hip will adversely affect the joint's range of motion and ability to bear weight.

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  • Total Hip Replacement

    Hip replacement has become necessary for your arthritic hip: this is one of the most effective operations known and should give you many years of freedom from pain.

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  • Anterior Hip Replacement

    Direct Anterior Hip Replacement is a technique in which hip replacement surgery is performed through an alternative approach compared to conventional hip replacement surgery. Historically, hip replacement surgery was performed utilizing traditional posterior or lateral approaches. This necessitates that certain muscles or tendons are cut in order to access the hip joint and perform the surgery.

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  • Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology for Total Hip Replacement

    Mako Robotic-Arm Assisted Technology provides you with a personalized surgical plan based on your unique anatomy. First, a CT scan of the diseased joint is taken. This CT scan is uploaded into the Mako System software, where a 3D model of your hip is created. This 3D model is used to pre-plan and assist your surgeon in performing your total hip replacement.

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  • Hip Fracture

    A hip fracture is a break that occurs near the hip in the upper part of the femur or thighbone. The thighbone has two bony processes on the upper part - the greater and lesser trochanters. The lesser trochanter projects from the base of the femoral neck on the back of the thighbone. Hip fractures can occur either due to a break in the femoral neck, in the area between the greater and lesser trochanter or below the lesser trochanter.

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  • Revision Hip Replacement

    Hip Revision will be explained to you prior to surgery including what is likely to be done, but in revision surgery the unexpected can happen and good planning can prevent most potential problems. The surgery is often but not always more extensive than your previous surgery and the complications similar but more frequent than the first operation.

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